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Gallbladder Surgery

At St. Joseph’s our team of general surgeons perform more adult inpatient general surgeries than any other hospital in the region* and more adult inpatient general robotics surgeries than all five area hospitals. Research suggests that high-volume procedures result in improved patient outcomes. Our board-certified surgeons specialize in gallbladder surgery also known as cholecystectomy. Following surgery, our magnet recgonized nursing staff provide the best post operative care a patient could ask for.


Open Procedure versus Laparoscopic

A cholecystectomy is a surgical procedure to remove your gallbladder which sits just below your liver on the upper right side of your abdomen. Your gallbladder collects and stores bile — a digestive fluid produced in your liver.


A cholecystectomy is most commonly performed by inserting a tiny video camera and special surgical tools through four small incisions to see inside your abdomen and remove the gallbladder. Doctors call this a laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

In some cases, one large incision may be used to remove the gallbladder. This is called an open cholecystectomy.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

You may need this surgery if you have pain or other symptoms from gallstones. You may also need it if your gallbladder is not working normally.

Common symptoms may include:

  • Indigestion, including bloating, heartburn, and gas
  • Pain after eating, usually in the upper right or upper middle area of your belly (epigastric pain)
  • Nausea and vomiting

Most people have a quicker recovery and fewer problems with laparoscopic surgery than with open surgery.

Before the Procedure

You may have the following tests done before your surgery:

Tell your health care provider:

  • If you are or might be pregnant
  • What medicines, vitamins, and other supplements you are taking, even ones you bought without a prescription

After the Procedure

If you do not have any problems, you will be able to go home when you are able to drink liquids easily and your pain can be treated with pain pills. Most people go home on the same day or the day after this surgery.

If there were problems during surgery, or if you have bleeding, a lot of pain, or a fever, you may need to stay in the hospital longer.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most people recover quickly and have good results from this procedure.

References
Glasgow RE, Mulvihill SJ. Treatment of gallstone disease: In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 66.

Jackson PG, Evans SRT. Biliary system. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 55

*Other source
**Per Intuitive Surgical; Syracuse MSA data 2016